Fanon: Wretched of the Earth

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Fanon: Wretched of the Earth

$95.00

Fridays from 5:30 to 7:30PM
January 30 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

SKU: 2015W-FANONWRE Categories: , Tag:

Description

A film with Six-Week Class
Beginning Friday January 30, 2015
Kazembe Balagun

“The settler makes history and is conscious of making it. And because he constantly refers to the history of his mother country, he clearly indicates that he himself is the extension of that mother country. Thus the history which he writes is not the history of the country which he plunders but the history of his own nation in regard to all that she skims off, all that she violates and starves.”
—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Continuing the reading and writing of Frantz Fanon’s works. We will open up this winter with a film on the role of violence furthering or hindering liberation.

6-Session Class Begins
Friday, February 6, 5:30 PM at The Commons

Please note: This term begins with an extra session – a special film screening held on January 30 @ Interference Archive
131 8th Street, No. 4 • Brooklyn, NY 11215

6-Session Class Begins
Friday, February 6, 5:30 PM at The Commons

With deft analysis and radical fervor, Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was the patron saint of the revolutionary movements of the global south. As a psychiatrist and writer he played a key part in the liberation of Algeria. His seminal work Wretched of the Earth is still considered “The Handbook of Black Revolution” and influenced everyone from the Black Panthers to cultural workers like film maker Gillo Pontecorvo, Marlon Riggs and bell hooks. This term we will focus on Fanon’s most developed work The Wretched of The Earth.

Along with reading The Wretched of the Earth works selected from Richard Wright, Karl Marx, bell hooks, G.W.F Hegel and Amiri Baraka will be taken on. We will also produce written reflections and will present some of these and more at a public symposium to take place during the coming spring of 2015.

Kazembe Balagun has a BA in Philosophy and Black Studies from Hunter College/CUNY and a MS in Education from Pace University. He has been featured in Time Out New York, The UK Guardian, German Public Radio and the New York Times and contributed “We Be Reading Marx Where We From” to the critically acclaimed anthology Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA. As a cultural activist he has cointinually sought to create intersections between Marxism, queer theory, feminism and Black liberation movements. He works as Project Manager at the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung, New York Office.

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Introduction to Autonomist Marxism: From Its Roots to Cyber-Marx

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Introduction to Autonomist Marxism: From Its Roots to Cyber-Marx

$125.00

Thursdays from 5:30 to 7:30PM
January 29 through April 16, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

SKU: 2015W-AUTONOMARX Categories: , Tags: ,

Description

Autonomist Marxism is an anti-authoritarian, democratic tradition whose roots go back to the early 20th century “Left”- and Council Communists. In The U.S., the tradition has come to be most often associated with Antonio Negri but in fact is far, far broader. Yet, Autonomist thought and analysis is often ignored or derided by other “brands” of Marxism. Why? Perhaps because “Autonomists”:

  • Don’t read Marx (or Lenin, Trotsky, Mao, etc.,) as divine gospel and undertake a rigorous reappraisal/critique without abandoning or becoming anti-Marx like so many “post-modernists” maintaining instead that Marx is still the essential starting point for understanding today’s capitalism and is still as relevant today as he was a century and a half ago;
  • Reject vanguard party Marxism (where the working class first needs to be educated by “outside intellectuals” in order to understand its “true” interests and then led by them in the revolution and ruled by them afterwards);
  • Don’t see Capitalism as the all powerful Oz, the “man behind the curtain” pulling the strings of a working class that rarely makes an on-stage appearance on its own terms;
  • Believe “struggle” is central to any analysis of capitalist class relations taking seriously Marx’s pronouncement in the Communist Manifesto that “the history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggle” and reject the idea that capital/capitalism is a set of abstract laws that exist absent and apart from working class struggle;
  • View race and gender along with class as fundamental to both the development of capitalism, as well as the ongoing forms of capitalist exploitation, oppression and reproduction; and,
  • See the working class as being more than the just industrial proletariat e.g., unwaged workers, students, housewives, etc.

The class will cover the historical roots of Autonomist thought, read some of the foundational Italian and American texts and conclude with more recent works such as Nick-Dyer Witheford’s “Cyber-Marx” and essays in “Beyond Marx.”

Dan Karan has worked for NYC housing and community development organizations for 25 years and studied Marxism for nearly 40.

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An Indigenous People’s Reading Group: Almanac of the Dead

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An Indigenous People’s Reading Group: Almanac of the Dead

$55.00

Wednesdays from 7:30 to 9:30PM
February 1 through March 4, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

We will read Leslie Marmon Silko’s Almanac of The Dead, which takes place against the backdrop of the American Southwest and Central America. It follows dozens of characters. Much of the story takes place in the present day, although lengthy flashbacks and indigenous mythology interweave throughout. The novel’s numerous characters are often separated by both time and space. Many of characters are involved in either crime or revolution.

Leslie Marmon Silko was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Silko has noted herself as being one-quarter Laguna Pueblo (a Keres speaking tribe), also identifying as Anglo American and Mexican American. Silko grew up on the edge of pueblo society at the edge of the Laguna Pueblo reservation. While her parents worked, Silko and her two sisters were cared for by their grandmother, Lillie Stagner, and great-grandmother, Helen Romero, both story tellers. Silko learned much of the traditional stories of the Laguna people from her grandmother, whom she called A’mooh, her aunt Susie, and her grandfather Hank during her early years.

The Indigenous Peoples’s Reading Group has grown from the enthusiastic call for the need of greater understanding of the long history of the peoples of North America who were here before and remain after the European colonists came to settle and bring this hemisphere and those peoples under their control and exploitation, following a stirring presentation by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz this past September introducing An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States.

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