Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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21st Century Struggles: Precarity, Repression, and Organizing Resistance

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21st Century Struggles: Precarity, Repression, and Organizing Resistance

$130.00

Mondays from 7:30 to 9:30PM
February 9 through May 18, 2015
at The Commons Brooklyn

SKU: 2015W-PRECARITY Categories: , ,

Description

Suggested donation: $75 to $100 each multi-week session or $10 per evening
SPECIAL: $130 IF BOTH PAID BY FEBRUARY 28
No one turned away for inability to pay

Part 1: International Capital and Labor Today
6-week session
February 9 to March 16

Special Session with Bill Henning on the Fight for Contracts for Workers Today
March 23

Part 2: National and International Proposals and Strategies
8-week session
March 30 to May 18

Current capitalism is characterized by instability and contingency on a global scale accompanied by the political imposition of austerity and the undoing of the social wage in developed economies. At the same time, the capitalist class has accumulated immense wealth. By 2016 one percent of the world’s people will possess more than half of the world’s wealth. This trend has intensified every year for the last two decades.

Many theorists emphasize the rise of precariousness (or precarity) in many sectors as a hallmark of neoliberal, globalized capitalism. Most of us are experiencing this in an existential way. We and/or our families and friends can no longer count on a job with a living wage and benefits or on keeping a roof over our heads. We are living through a relentless, systematic marginalization of productive people who at one time could expect a relatively secure existence in the capitalist economy. Now, skilled factory and clerical workers take the jobs of unskilled workers. Unskilled workers become day laborers and fast-food vendors. The petite bourgeoisie of small owners, managers, and professionals scrape by with livings as free-lancers, adjuncts, and consultants.

The Precarity Task Force is exploring these conditions in a two-part class this spring. In the first part, we read Ursula Huws’ Labor in the Global Digital Economy and Samir Amin’s The Implosion of Contemporary Capitalism. The second part focuses on ideas from a spectrum of the Left about ways of confronting these realities, with readings of Guy Standing’s A Precariat Charter and Stanley Aronowitz’s just published The Death and Life of American Labor, and concludes with readings about new forms of struggle and organizing around the world in the anthology New Forms of Worker Organization, edited by Immanuel Ness.

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Nietzsche, Heidegger, Fascism & Left Nietzscheans: A Marxist Assessment

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Nietzsche, Heidegger, Fascism & Left Nietzscheans: A Marxist Assessment

$125.00

Thursdays from 7:30 to 9:30PM
February 5 through April 16, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

SKU: 2015W-NIETZSCHEHEID Categories: , , Tags: , ,

Description

During these sessions we will explore the seminal theories of the most important philosophical challenge to the Hegelian and Marxist tradition: those of Nietzsche and Heidegger. We will explore Heidegger?s involvement with Nazism and how that impacts on his philosophy.

We will follow up with an exploration of Heidegger?s influence on some of the key left thinkers of the last century ? Alexandre Kojeve, Jacques Lacan, Michel Foucault and Slavoj Zizek. Harrison Fluss, a phD candidate at SUNY Stony Brook and a past presenter at the Left Forum and Historical Materialism will be contributing his specialized knowledge in this area.

ALEX STEINBERG has taught Engels and the Dialectics of Nature and most recently, Spectres ofthe Dialectic from the Big Bang to the Multiversein the fall of 2014. He has previously given classes on Hegel and Marxist philosophy and been a presenter at the Left Forum. He has also served on the local and national boards of radio station WBAI.

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Black Reconstruction in America: W.E.B. DuBois

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Black Reconstruction in America: W.E.B. DuBois

$185.00

Wednesdays from 5:30 to 7:30PM
February 4 through May 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

SKU: 2015W-BLACKRECONST Categories: , , Tags: ,

Description

Black Reconstruction is an essential and primary building block in understanding the culture and politics of the United States. It is also an excellent (arguably the best) place to start understanding the workers movements in the U.S and the historical and current challenges to building a labor movement, and the relationship a real labor movement must have to democratic movements of the oppressed.

In fifteen weeks we will cover the 17 chapters of Black Reconstruction with a concentration on labor organization and the relationship to the fight against slavery, and the revolutionary democratic movement of African Americans.

People interested in this reading group, should get the book and try to read the first two chapters before the first session.

Tim Schermerhorn is a 30-year transit worker and a rank-and-file- oriented organizer throughout that time. He was vice president of Local 100 and vice chairman (chief steward) for train operators. Tim is a founding member of the Black Workers Rank and File Network (at the 2008 Labor Notes Conference) and a Labor Notes Policy Committee Member.

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Black Literature & Revolutionary Consciousness

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Black Literature & Revolutionary Consciousness

$110.00

Mondays from 5:30 to 7:30PM
February 2 through April 6, 2015
at The Commons Brooklyn

Description

I would at times feel that learning to read had been a curse rather than a blessing. It opened my eyes to the horrible pit, but to no ladder upon which to get out. I envied my fellow-slaves for their stupidity. Freedom now appeared, to disappear no more forever. I saw nothing without seeing it, I heard nothing without hearing it, and felt nothing without feeling it. It looked from every star; it smiled in every calm, breathed in every wind and moved in every storm.

—Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave

What will you do with your freedom? It is the question inherited by each generation of Black writers. From the antebellum slave-narrative of Frederick Douglass to the modernist tragedies of Toni Morrison the answer demanded a revolutionary consciousness. One could not heal the traumatized Black body and fractured psyche without a prophetic vision of radical change. Literature is the treasure house of that vision as well as the bitter accounting of its toll on our lives.

In this 10 week course, we will learn about literary conventions and aesthetic strategies, the conflict between art and ideology and finally the history of the African-American canon and why it is the shadow text of the Constitution. Among our readings will be Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Frederick Douglass and From Pieces to Weight: Once Upon a Time in Southside Queens by 50 Cent.

Nicholas Powers is a poet, journalist and Associate Professor of Literature at SUNY Old Westbury. His second book The Ground Below Zero: 911 to Burning Man, New Orleans to Darfur, Haiti to Occupy Wall Street was published by Upset Press in 2013. His writings have appeared in The Indypendent, The Village Voice, Truth-Out and Alternet.

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Capital: Volume I, Chapters 15-33

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Capital: Volume I, Chapters 15-33

$125.00

Sundays from 5:30 to 7:30PM
February 1 through March 29, 2015
Email for location

SKU: 2015W-CAPITAL Categories: , , Tags: , , ,

Description

Marx’s Capital remains the fundamental text for understanding how capitalism works. By unraveling the commoditized forms of our interactions with nature and each other, it provides tools to understand capitalism’s astounding innovativeness and productivity, intertwined with growing inequality and misery, alienation, the stunting of human potential, and ecological destruction all over the globe. In this way, Capital offers the reader a methodology for doing our own analysis of current developments. On top of that, many (though not all) sections of Volume I are surprisingly accessible and beautifully written.

This group began in September, supplementing our own intensive reading of the text with new on-line aids and current articles that illustrate capitalism’s developmental tendencies, or what Marx calls its laws of motion. We plan to finish Volume I this term.

Along with our own intensive reading of the text, we’ll use new online and visual aids and current articles that illustrate capitalism’s developmental tendencies or what Marx calls its laws of motion.

Participants will be encouraged to be as active as they desire through reports and presentations.

New folks are welcome to join if this is a logical place for you to jump in or jump back in. For more information and location of the class, please e-mail jucelli@igc.org.

Juliet Ucelli has taught Capital at the New York Marxist School and labor economics for labor unions, as well as adult basic education and GED preparation. Currently a high school social worker, she has written on Eurocentrism in Marxist theory, the politics of inner-city public schooling and other topics. Her “Introduction to Capital, Volume I” can be accessed at http://thecommonsbrooklyn.org/intensive-readings-2014

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Hegel’s Science of Logic

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Note that there will be no class meeting Friday, February 20 in support of attendance of an event for political prisoners at St. Peter’s Church (East 54th Street and Lexington Avenue). For more information visit LynneStewart.org

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Hegel’s Science of Logic

$125.00

Fridays from 7:30 to 9:30PM
January 30 through April 17, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

SKU: 2015W-HEGEL Categories: , , Tag:

Description

Hegel’s philosophy has had a great influence on much of what has happened in the world since his time (1770 – 1831) and is crucial to understanding much of modern social thought and philosophy as well as to understanding Marxism and the socialist tradition in its varied aspects.

We are going to continue reading the entire Science of Logic over this 2014-2015 until August 2015. You don’t have to commit yourself to the whole course, though you will probably want to. The work divides into three sections. This Fall of 2014 we covered part one, “The Doctrine of Being”. This term we will cover the entire second section, “The Doctrine of Essence”, discussing in detail what Hegel is trying to do as well as how what he is doing fits into the general project of Hegel’s whole philosophical “system”. We will start the course with a review of what has already gone on in the work up to this second section of the work, so nobody will be lost, even if they were not able to take the previous course. We will also be discussing how Hegel’s views here made it possible for Hegel to come to the socially reactionary conclusions that he ultimately drew, while at the same time they were inspirational for so many radical and progressive thinkers as well, including Marx and Engels. This coming Summer of 2015 we will cover part three of the Science of Logic, “The Doctrine of the Concept”.

This course will run 12 weeks on Friday evenings from 7:30 PM to 9:30 PM from January 30 to April 17, 2015. We will be reading the edition of Hegel’s Science of Logic translated by A. V. Miller, and published by Humanity Books. (Arrangements will be made for students who cannot afford to buy

Russell Dale is an activist and a philosopher. He teaches philosophy at Lehman College, CUNY. He taught classes on Hegel at the Brecht Forum for the last five years of that institution’s existence. Russell is also on the Manuscript Collective and Editorial Board of the Marxist journal Science & Society, as well as on the Local Station Board of radio station WBAI, 99.5 FM (wbai.org).

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