Re-Discovering Fanon: Preview to a work in progress

Re-Discovering Fanon: Preview to a work in progress
An evening with outtakes and director Rico Speight

Re-Discovering Fanon will make evident Fanon’s unrelenting hatred of racism and his uncompromising determination to set forth a dialectic of disalienation in order to bring about a new humanity. Using quotes from his writings, archival footage, still images, and interviews with scholars, colleagues and family members, the documentary will probe the question, “Who was Frantz Fanon?”

Rico Speight is an independent producer/director/writer of film and theatre; he is also a film and video editor and educator. His production credits include documentaries, narratives, television productions, web productions and live theatre. His documentary, Who’s Gonna Take the Weight?, the first installment of a two part series on the parallel lives of African American and Black South African young people was released in 1997; in 1999, that documentary screened at the 52nd Cannes International Film Festival. In 2007, Speight released a follow-up production titled, Where Are They Now?, that is a sequel to Who’s Gonna Take The Weight?

For Re-Discovering Fanon, Rico traveled to Martinique in 2005 and conducted extensive research for the documentary; in November of 2007 he began actual production in Martinique, interviewing members of Fanon’s family in Fort de France. He currently lectures on film production at Sarah Lawrence College and is a freelance television studio director for CUNY Television and NYU-TV in New York City.

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Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes of Anti-Imperialist Defense

The settler makes history and is conscious of making it. And because he constantly refers to the history of his mother country, he clearly indicates that he himself is the extension of that mother country. Thus the history which he writes is not the history of the country which he plunders but the history of his own nation in regard to all that she skims off, all that she violates and starves.

—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Continuing the reading and writing of Frantz Fanon’s works, we will open up this winter with a film on the role of violence furthering or hindering liberation. This term begins with the film on January 30 at Interference Archive.

In the course of 2014 Interference Archive and the Marxist Education Project held study groups regarding Frantz Fanon. On January 30 we will come together for a screening of Concerning Violence, based largely on Fanon’s seminal text, The Wretched of the Earth. We hope this film can advance our discussions forward in light on strategy and tactics within the growing anti-police brutality and militarization campaigns. The screening is also kick off of a six week class on The Wretched of the Earth taking place at the Commons Friday nights for six weeks, beginning February 6.

Concerning Violence is a bold and fresh visual narrative on Africa, based on newly discovered archive material covering the struggle for liberation from colonial rule in the late ‘60s and ‘70s, accompanied by text from Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth.

 

Contributions accepted  |  No one turned away for inability to pay

 

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Fanon: Wretched of the Earth

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Fanon: Wretched of the Earth

$95.00

Fridays from 5:30 to 7:30PM
January 30 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

SKU: 2015W-FANONWRE Categories: , Tag:

Description

A film with Six-Week Class
Beginning Friday January 30, 2015
Kazembe Balagun

“The settler makes history and is conscious of making it. And because he constantly refers to the history of his mother country, he clearly indicates that he himself is the extension of that mother country. Thus the history which he writes is not the history of the country which he plunders but the history of his own nation in regard to all that she skims off, all that she violates and starves.”
—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Continuing the reading and writing of Frantz Fanon’s works. We will open up this winter with a film on the role of violence furthering or hindering liberation.

6-Session Class Begins
Friday, February 6, 5:30 PM at The Commons

Please note: This term begins with an extra session – a special film screening held on January 30 @ Interference Archive
131 8th Street, No. 4 • Brooklyn, NY 11215

6-Session Class Begins
Friday, February 6, 5:30 PM at The Commons

With deft analysis and radical fervor, Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was the patron saint of the revolutionary movements of the global south. As a psychiatrist and writer he played a key part in the liberation of Algeria. His seminal work Wretched of the Earth is still considered “The Handbook of Black Revolution” and influenced everyone from the Black Panthers to cultural workers like film maker Gillo Pontecorvo, Marlon Riggs and bell hooks. This term we will focus on Fanon’s most developed work The Wretched of The Earth.

Along with reading The Wretched of the Earth works selected from Richard Wright, Karl Marx, bell hooks, G.W.F Hegel and Amiri Baraka will be taken on. We will also produce written reflections and will present some of these and more at a public symposium to take place during the coming spring of 2015.

Kazembe Balagun has a BA in Philosophy and Black Studies from Hunter College/CUNY and a MS in Education from Pace University. He has been featured in Time Out New York, The UK Guardian, German Public Radio and the New York Times and contributed “We Be Reading Marx Where We From” to the critically acclaimed anthology Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA. As a cultural activist he has cointinually sought to create intersections between Marxism, queer theory, feminism and Black liberation movements. He works as Project Manager at the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung, New York Office.

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Fanon Black Skin, White Masks with Kazembe Balagun

A Reading and Writing Group on the Seminal Work of Frantz Fanon

With deft analysis and radical fervor, Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was the patron saint of the revolutionary movements of the global south. As a psychiatrist and writer he played a key part in the liberation of Algeria. His seminal work Wretched of the Earth is still considered “The Handbook of Black Revolution” and influenced everyone from the Black Panthers to cultural workers like film maker Gillo Pontecorvo, Marlon Riggs and bell hooks.

This group will focus on Fanon’s first published work Black Skin, White Masks. Mixing and remixing the colonized experience with critical readings of Marx, Hegel and Lacan, Black Skin, White Masks prefigured many contemporary conversations on race, gender and sexuality.

We will read Black Skin, White Masks along with the works of Richard Wright, Karl Marx, bell hooks, G.W.F Hegel and Amiri Baraka. In addition to our reading, this group will be charged with producing their own written reflections and will present at a public symposium to take place in late 2014 or early 2015.

Kazembe Balagun has a BA in Philosophy and Black Studies from Hunter College/CUNY and a MS in Education from Pace University. He has been featured in Time Out New York, The UK Guardian, German Public Radio and the New York Times and contributed “We Be Reading Marx Where We From” to the critically acclaimed anthology Imagine: Living in a Socialist USA. As a cultural activist he has continually sought to create intersections between Marxism, queer theory, feminism and Black liberation movements. He works as Project Manager at the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung, New York Office.

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