The Working Class Goes to Heaven

Final Friday Film Series
a continuation of The Anti-Bourgeois Film Series

La Classe Operaia Va In Paradiso
Italy, 1971, 125 Min
DIRECTED BY Elio Petri
CAST Gian Maria Volontè, Mariangela Melato, Gino Pernice, Luigi Diberti, Donato Castellaneta, Giuseppe Fortis, Flavio Bucci, Ezio Marano, Adriano Amidei Migliano
MUSIC Ennio Morricone

If this Italian drama were any less well told, it would come off as a pure union propaganda piece. Instead, it is a worthy film for the director who made the acclaimed film Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion. In any manufacturing situation, it simply doesn’t pay to be the fastest and hardest working person on the assembly line. In the first place, you probably can’t keep up the pace you’ve set. In the second place, you make all your co-workers a) look bad and b) have to work harder; they will not thank you for this.Lulu Massa (Gian Maria Volonte) is a highly productive worker at a factory paying piece work but is disliked by his colleagues as his efficiency is used by management to justify their demands for higher output. While employees are told to care for and rely on their machines, they see radical students outside the factory campaigning for higher pay rates and less work. Lulu lives with Lidia and her son. He puts his lack of interest in sex with her down to the pressures of the job.

Lulu loses a finger in a work accident, which the workers blame on the faster times. Shocked, he adopts the students’ analysis and takes strike action to end piece work, against the unions’ policy, which is for simply an increase in piece work rates.

During that time, he visits a colleague who shows him not only the error of his own ways, but the horror of his whole working situation. When he goes back to work, Massa tries to organize a union.            –adapted from the allmovie guide, 2011is

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″]

Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Reviews

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Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

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Please follow and like us:

Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″]

Fridays at the Movies: Class, Crime, and International Film Noir

$55.00

Fridays from 7:00 to 9:30PM
February 20 through March 13, 2015
@ The Brooklyn Commons

Description

The crime film and particularly its darker variant, the film noir, has often functioned both as a lament for hoped-for social changes that never happened and as a critique of rapacious capitalism that noir lmmakers depicted as sweeping away all human feelings. e course traces through lectures, films, and discussion the evolution of film noir as a critical force.

We will begin with American noir looking at the immediate postwar period of labor strife (Brute Force), then circles back to noir as an expression of the last days of the French Popular Front (Le Jour se lève). We then look at neorealismo nero as an expression in postwar Italy of another Popular Front defeat (Bitter Rice) and finally we conclude by jumping to the present with a viewing of Chinese cinema as the site of noir’s most political contemporary expression in its marking of the deterioriation of relationships under a pure money economy (Black Coal).

Schedule

Friday, Feb. 20: Brute Force
Friday, February 27: Le Jour se lève
Friday, March 6: Bitter Rice
Friday, March 13: Black Coal

Join us for thrills, chills, and a tracing of the now almost century old continual presence of this resistant form of film critiquing the imposition of the rule of money by the bourgeoisie and their criminal allies.

Professor Dennis Broe is the author of Film Noir, American Workers and Postwar Hollywood; Class, Crime and International Film Noir: Globalizing America’s Dark Art; Maverick or How the West was Lost; and the upcoming The End of Leisure and the Birth of Binge: Hyperindustrialism and Television Seriality. He is a film and television critic for the Pacica Network and WBAI’s Arts Express Radio and his “World Film Beat” and “Bro on the Global Television Beat” columns can be found at the James Agee Cinema Circle.

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Concerning Violence: Nine Scenes of Anti-Imperialist Defense

The settler makes history and is conscious of making it. And because he constantly refers to the history of his mother country, he clearly indicates that he himself is the extension of that mother country. Thus the history which he writes is not the history of the country which he plunders but the history of his own nation in regard to all that she skims off, all that she violates and starves.

—Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth

Continuing the reading and writing of Frantz Fanon’s works, we will open up this winter with a film on the role of violence furthering or hindering liberation. This term begins with the film on January 30 at Interference Archive.

In the course of 2014 Interference Archive and the Marxist Education Project held study groups regarding Frantz Fanon. On January 30 we will come together for a screening of Concerning Violence, based largely on Fanon’s seminal text, The Wretched of the Earth. We hope this film can advance our discussions forward in light on strategy and tactics within the growing anti-police brutality and militarization campaigns. The screening is also kick off of a six week class on The Wretched of the Earth taking place at the Commons Friday nights for six weeks, beginning February 6.

Concerning Violence is a bold and fresh visual narrative on Africa, based on newly discovered archive material covering the struggle for liberation from colonial rule in the late ‘60s and ‘70s, accompanied by text from Frantz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth.

 

Contributions accepted  |  No one turned away for inability to pay

 

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