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April 2020

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, April 9 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, April 2 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

March 2020

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, March 26 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, March 19 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, March 12 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, March 5 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

February 2020

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, February 27 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, February 20 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, February 13 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, February 6 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

January 2020

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, January 30 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »

American Writing: Changing Locations

Thu, January 23 @ 7:30 PM - 9:30 PM
|Recurring Event (See all)

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

An event every week that begins at 7:30 PM on Thursday, repeating until Thu, April 9, 2020

The Brooklyn Commons, 388 Atlantic Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11217
+ Google Map
$95 – $125

Season 1: Changing Places in America

Herman Melville,  The Confidence-Man (1857). John Barth, The Sot-Weed Factor (1960) Lisa Ko, The Leavers (2017)

In his 1970 essay “Philosophy and the Form of Fiction,” William Gass brought the term “metafiction” forward to the reading public as a way to characterize the work writers such as Borges, Barth, Flann O’Brien, as well as the type of novels Gass himself would write. He described metafiction as writing “in which the forms of fiction serve as the material upon which further forms can be imposed”. Does metafiction provide escape for the committed writer from the bourgeois strictures that the novel form imposes? As critical readers we need to check out all the angles. The metafiction form will over time become incorporated as yet another aspect of modern fiction as ultimately there is no way to over-ride what happens when ink is committed to paper, impulses to the interactive screen.

American fiction writers have lots to write about. We are introducing a four term look at writing by American authors who have novels appropriate to four themes important to critical thinkers of the broad American questions on nation, class, race and gender. Much of this fiction becomes part of what our unfolding reality is as a nation, group of nations, as aspiring internationalists. Many of the fictional works we will read are not as formally postmodern or would formally fall in the metafiction category as delineated by Barth.

Find out more »